Description
HUMAN/ANIMAL IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION
** available as of 06/30/2021
This seminar explores the liminality that has continually demarcated the frontier between human and animal in the history of Western civilization. We will engage diverse historical-philosophical approaches to the question of what constitutes human as opposed to animal, beginning with ancient Greek philosophy, and tracing contemporary ideas back to their origins in the Graeco-Christian worldview. We will investigate the shifting human/animal frontier during the Renaissance and the scientific revolution of the seventeenth-century, in the Enlightenment and Romanticism, and in contemporary thought. By reconstructing the genesis of human/animal debates, we will transgress the bounds of sectarian divisions between styles of thinking and become more self-conscious about history and philosophy of science as an intellectually multi-faceted form of inquiry open to pluralism and diversity.
Details
Grading Basis
Grad LG/SNC Basis
Units
3
Offering
Course
HPS 2118
Academic Group
Dietrich Sch Arts and Sciences
Academic Organization
History & Philosophy of Sci
Campus
Pittsburgh Campus