STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF CRITICAL WATER RESOURCES
Session
Academic Term
Class Number
29687
Career
Undergraduate
Dates
1/19/2021 - 4/23/2021
Units
3 units
Grading
Letter Grade
Description
This transdisciplinary course is intended to help students develop critical thinking skills in fraught socio-political environments, and gain a command of analytical techniques that support planning and strategic decision making in contexts of great complexity and extreme uncertainty. The course is one of a cluster of three courses, the development of which is funded by the NEH. The course is supported by the intellectual and administrative resources of the University of Pittsburgh's Center for Russian and East European Studies (REES) and Asian Studies Center (ASC), in addition to the resources of the Katz Graduate School of Business/College of Business Administration and the Swanson School of Engineering. The History and Political Science Departments have also been intensely involved in the design and development of the course. Like the two other courses in the cluster funded by NEH, this course, while designed to stand alone, is linked with the two other courses by the common focus on the issue of water resources and on the countries of Central Asia. There is a natural progression to these three courses, with this course being the final one in the sequence. The key content of the two preceding courses, which focus on historical and political science perspectives are summarized in the early sessions of this course. Understanding the challenge of scarce water resources, which poses an existential threat to individuals, industries, communities, countries and indeed to humanity, will be one of the three themes of the course. Approaches adopted in other countries to respond to water scarcity will be critically examined. The second theme is understanding the socio-political and economic context of Central Asian countries with the primary focus being on Kazakhstan. The third theme, drawing from the other two will frame the challenge as a "wicked problem" which is not amenable to resolution by traditional problem-solving techniques. Analytical and planning techniques that are designed to address wicked problems will be described. Teams of students will employ these techniques to develop strategies for Kazakhstan's issues with water.
Class Attributes
Asian Studies
European and Eurasian Studies
Global Studies
Russian & East European Studies
Class Notes
The planned operational mode for this class when meeting in-person is FULL COHORT. For more information please visit http://www.provost.pitt.edu/students/student-success-flexpitt/flex-pitt-guarded-risk-posture-full-cohort-classroom/.

Class Details
Instructor(s)
John Camillus
Meets
TuTh 12:40PM - 1:55PM
Meeting Dates
01/19/2021 - 04/23/2021
Room
342 Craig Hall
Campus
Pittsburgh Campus
Location
Pittsburgh Campus
Components
Lecture Required
Textbooks/Materials
Textbooks to be determined
Class Availability
Status
Open
Seats Taken
13
Seats Open
13
Class Capacity
26
Unrestricted Seats
13
Restricted Seats
0
Wait List Total
0
Wait List Capacity
20